Tonight’s Special 🍴

 

Mojo Mahi Mahi

 
with Cuban Black Beans & Rice w/ Soup or Salad $17
 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
4pm-8pm
 
#TheplacetoB!

Tonight’s Special 🍴

 

Prime Rib or All You Can Eat Cod

 
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

Each Entree Comes with Soup or Salad, Choice of Side and a Dinner Roll

 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
4pm-8pm
 
#TheplacetoB!

Tonight’s Special 🍴

 

Chicken Cordon Bleu Wrap

 
w/ choice of side $9.00
 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
4pm-8pm
 
#TheplacetoB!

Germanfest Dinner

Tuesday, January 22nd

$30 per person
6pm-8pm

Appetizer
Pretzels + Mustard
Followed by Green Bean Salad

Main Course
Pork Schnitzel + Sauerkraut with Bratwurst
Followed by Sauerbraten, German Potato Salad & Red Cabbage with Apple

Dessert
Homemade Black Forest Torte

Reserve Your Spot!
Call us at (616) 984-2381 or message us on Facebook
Deadline to sign up is tomorrow at noon!

 

 

Tonight’s Special 🍴

 

Pulled Pork, Black Bean & Rice Burrito $9.50

 
NOW on Wednesdays, Kids eat free!
Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal.   (Cannot be combined with other discounts)
 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
4pm-8pm
 
#TheplacetoB!

5 tips to help you keep your golf resolutions in 2019

Written by: T.J. Auclair

The new year has arrived and a lot of you golfers out there might be uttering the words, “new year, new me.”

Most of us make New Year’s resolutions and, unfortunately, most of us fail to see them through for all 365 days.

If your resolution involved improving your golf game in 2019, here’s a list of things you can do every day/week — even if you’re in the bitter cold like a lot of folks right now — to help you achieve those goals.

And, once it warms up in your area, you can take all five of these drills outside.

5. Exercise. Yeah, we know. That’s what we should be doing every day anyway, right? But when it comes to golf, you don’t want to be tight. There are a number of stretches you can do right from your desk while reading emails that will benefit your arms, shoulders, neck, back, hips and legs for golf season.

Even better, place one of those handy, elastic, tension bands in the top drawer of your desk.

4. Take 100 swings per day in your house or garage… without a golf ball. The best players in the world visualize the shot they want to hit before they hit it. With a drill like this one, you’re going to be forced to visualize, because there’s no ball there to hit. If you’re able, place a mirror in front of you and pay attention to the positions of your address, takeaway, the top of your swing and impact position as well as follow through. Do it in slow motion. Become an expert on your swing.

3. Work on your chipping. Can’t do it outside? No worries. You can purchase a chipping net, or even put down a hula-hoop as a target. Get a few foam golf balls and a tiny turf mat to hit the balls off of.

Will it produce the same feel as a real golf ball? Of course not. But what it will do is force you to focus on a target and repeat the same motion over and over. After a long layoff, “touch,” is the first thing that goes for all golfers.

This will help you to work on some semblance of touch all winter long.

2. Practice your putting. Anywhere. All you need is a putter, a golf ball, a flat surface and an object — any object — to putt at. If you’re so inclined, rollout turf can be purchased for around $20 with holes cut out.

Since the greens are where you’re going to take most of your strokes, doesn’t it make sense to dial that in whenever possible? It can be fun too. Does your significant other, roommate, or child play? Have regular putting contests.

The feel you gain during those sessions may not seem like much, but man will they come in handy when your season begins on the real grass.

1. Make a weekly appointment with your PGA Professional. Even in areas of the country that are suffering through the cruelest of winter conditions, you can always find a place to hit golf balls inside. Contact your local PGA Professional to find out where places like this in your area exist. You might be surprised at all the options you have.

With your PGA Professional in tow, you can work on your swing throughout the winter months and keep your game sharp. How nice would it be to be on top of your game as soon as the courses in your area open in the spring?

 

Written by: T.J. Auclair
Source: https://www.pga.com/news/golf-buzz/5-tips-help-keep-your-golf-resolutions-in-2019

Tonight’s Special 🍴

 

Pepper Steak

 
pepper steak over rice w/ choice of soup or salad and roll $13
 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
4pm-8pm
 
#TheplacetoB!

Tonight’s Special 🍴

Prime Rib & All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

 
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

Each Entree Comes with Soup or Salad, Choice of Side and a Dinner Roll

 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
4PM-8PM
 
#TheplacetoB!

Tonight’s Special 🍴

 

Prime Rib Dip

 
shaved prime rib, swiss cheese + grilled onions on a toasted roll served with au jus and a choice of side $10
 
Full menu also available
Carry out available~616-984-2381
 
#TheplacetoB!

Make the Ones You Hate to Miss

By: Jamie Lovemark

A six-footer is by no means a gimme, but it’s still short enough that it stings when it doesn’t go in. To make more of these, start by locking in your speed. It’s the most important part of every putt. And when you assess speed, don’t just factor how fast the ball needs to roll to get to the front of the cup. Think about it: You’re not trying to be so precise with your putting that the ball falls in on its last rotation. So forget the front of the cup. You should be looking at a spot 1½ feet beyond the hole. You’ll still be in tap-in range if you miss, but now you know the ball is going to get there every time.

Once you’ve determined that spot, then you can read the break. Start by walking to the hole, and try to picture the line in your head, keeping in mind that it continues 18 inches past the cup. Typically a putt of this length isn’t going to break that much—unless your course is Augusta National.

To get my speed down, I often practice with a small silicone cover over the top of the hole. The ball rolls right over it. If you don’t have one, you can just putt over the location of an old cup like I’m doing here (see bottom photo). The point is to get the ball to stop at a consistent distance beyond the hole. After I hit a putt that rolls over the cup and stops where I want it to stop, I’ll put a dime down to mark that end point. Then I’ll stroke putts over the hole trying to get every one to stop on a dime, so to speak.

DEVELOP A SHOT CLOCK
Having a pre-shot routine is important, but that doesn’t mean only doing the same things before every putt. Just as important is the amount of time you take to do those things. It will make a big difference if there’s a consistent duration from setup to stroke—it gives you good rhythm and confidence. Another thing you should do before you hit a putt is to take one last look at your line of putt all the way to the hole and then back to your ball—but do it quickly. The longer you stand over the ball, the more likely you’ll start to psych yourself out that you might miss. Good putting is a lot more mental than physical. Not a lot can go wrong with your stroke on a six-footer—it’s a fairly short and quiet motion. If you can relax and trust in what you’ve done prior to the putt, your chance of rolling one in will go way up.

BE AN ATHLETE, NOT A ROBOT
If you struggle with these makable putts, it’s probably because you’re too focused on using perfect mechanics. I’ve got news for you, guys like me on the PGA Tour rarely set up and make a textbook stroke, yet the tour average for putts made from six feet last season was 70 percent. What I’m saying is, there are a lot of ways to get the ball to go in the hole.

Putting is extremely personal, but everyone should feel comfortable over the ball. I like when my arms hang freely, and I have a slight roundness to my back. As for the stroke, I don’t think about the length the putter moves back and through. Instead, I try to be as athletic as possible, meaning my process is to look at what I have to do—then react. If you’re shooting a basketball, you don’t think about how hard your arm has to move for the ball to reach the basket, you just look at the rim and let it fly. Try putting with that same mind-set. —With Keely Levins

 

Source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/make-the-ones-you-hate-to-miss
Written by: Jamie Lovemark