Join us in the Grill for our weekly features!

Monday
$9
Breakfast Burger w/ Side

Tuesday
$11
Sesame Chicken Over White Rice

Wednesday
$9.50
Italian Sub w/ Pasta Salad

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal.**

Thursday
$10
Shrimp Po’ Boy w/ Side

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

each entree comes with soup or salad, choice of side and a dinner Roll

Saturday
$9.50
Asian Pork Burger w/ Side

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

Come have a night out with your ladies at Brookside!

This Thursday, July 18th | 7PM

$30 per person

  • 45 minute golf lesson
  • Followed by wine and cheese
  • Option to go play 9 holes after the lesson if you desire!

Give us a call to sign up!
(616) 984-2381

Michael Breed: The two things you need to escape the sand

By Michael Breed

Here’s your greenside sand lesson in two words: speed and bounce. Splashing a ball out of a bunker takes more power than you might think—that’s the speed part. And to use that speed effectively, the club has to slide through the sand without getting stuck—that’s the bounce. Focus on a few keys.

First, grip the handle more in your fingers than your palms. This will help you hinge your wrists on the backswing—notice I have a full wrist set by halfway back (above). I can use that lever to generate speed quickly.

Second, lower the handle at address, feeling more bend in your wrists. When your hands are low, the heel of the club is more exposed, and that helps the clubhead glide through at a consistent depth. Setting the hands higher raises the heel and can cause the toe to dig, which stops the swing short.

Third, stay centered as you go back, and then swing to the left through impact. To maintain the club’s bounce, don’t let the shaft rotate counterclockwise as you swing through. Your trail hand should stay under the shaft, the knuckles on your lead hand pointing up. Use these keys to hit quality bunker shots.

Source:GolfDigest.com

Join us in the Grill for our weekly features!

Monday
$9.50
Santa Fe Chicken Wrap w/ Choice of Side

Tuesday
$10
Vietnamese Chicken Salad w/ Roll

Wednesday
65 Cent Wings

$9
Cranberry Turkey Wrap w/ Side

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal.**

Thursday
$10
Loaded Taco Potato Skins

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

Both with Soup or Salad, Choice of Side and a Dinner Roll

Saturday
$10
Chicken Parmesan w/ Soup or Salad, and Dinner Roll

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

How to improve your contact with every club

By Renee Trudeau O’Higgins

I’m going to assume you don’t need my advice to hit a putt solidly. That’s pretty easy to do. But what about the rest of your game? If you’re honestly assessing it, are you making great contact most of the time on your drives, irons, pitches, chips and bunker shots? Yep, you can hit bunker shots solidly—you’re just hitting the sand, not the ball. And the same logic applies: Better contact means better results. So instead of worrying about whether your left arm is straight during the backswing or some other swing thought, let’s get your focus back to where it should be during a swing—hitting the ball with the center of the clubface. Here I’ll give you advice on how to do that, and how to play better from the sand.

IMPROVE YOUR SEQUENCING

Golf is a lot more fun when you’re hitting your driver solidly. Players who struggle with this club typically have sequencing issues—the upper body is too involved at the start of the downswing. That forces the club into a steep, out-to-in path, and the ball is struck with a glancing blow.

I advise you to routinely check your driver’s face to see where your impact was. If it’s “toey” a lot, try to make sure your chest stays in the top-of-backswing position a beat or two longer. To get a feel for that, make swings with your driver on an upslope; no ball needed. The goal is to brush the ground then clip the tee. If your club crashes into the ground behind the tee, or the tee flies to the left, you’re upper body is still leading the downswing. Instead, hold it off for a count, and feel your lower body shift up the slope first.

STAY CONNECTED

An arms-only swing leads to fat and thin chips. You’ve got to get your body moving to chip effectively.

To train the body pivot, place a tee in your armpit closest to the target. Swing back and through trying to keep it there. You will if your arms and body move as one.

“Skilled iron play is about hitting it flush from all sorts of lies.”

RANDOMIZE PRACTICE

How often do you hit the same iron from the same lie in the same round? There’s always some variance once you’re off the tee. That’s why hitting it flush from the fairway or rough is all about adaptability.

Try this drill to assess how well you adjust. Drop three balls that come to rest in your hitting area. Now try to strike each one as solidly as you can without changing anything but the club’s position at address. You’ll soon find you have better awareness of how to swing to get the club to bottom out in front of each ball. This drill prepares you for how to adapt to get solid contact every time you swing.

CONTROL THE FACE

Many greenside sand shots get thinned into the bunker’s face. The problem often stems from trying to maintain a wide-open clubface throughout the swing. I know, I know; you were told to do that. But the thing is, if you leave the face wide open, you’ve got to make a pretty aggressive swing to get the ball out. And for many golfers, a big swing leads to inconsistency.

Instead, try hitting bunker shots with a closed clubface at address. If you keep your grip pressure medium to light, the club will open as it moves through the sand, and you’ll hit a solid shot with far less effort.

Source:GolfDigest.com

Join us in the Grill for our weekly features!

Monday
$9
Meatloaf Sandwich w/ Side

Tuesday
$10
Prime Rib Philly w/ Side

Wednesday
65 Cent Wings

$12
Spinach Salad w/ Bacon Dressing + a Roll

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal.**

Thursday
$9
Crispy Chicken Bacon Jalapeno Ranch Wrap w/ Side

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

each entree comes with soup or salad, choice of side and a dinner Roll

Saturday
$10
Greek Chicken Flatbread Pizza

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

Seven Things You Need to Know About Golf Balls Before You Play

Written by: James Roland

All golf balls look pretty much alike. But what’s inside the ball can affect the height and distance of shots and even how the ball will spin when it lands. So before you tee it up, find out more about the ball and how it can affect your game.

What will it cost

Golf balls vary greatly in quality and price, so before deciding on a particular make and model, know how much you can afford to spend and how quickly you go through a dozen golf balls. If you’re still learning or you lose a ball every couple of holes, you’ll want to stay away from the top-of-the-line balls, and, perhaps, consider used (or reclaimed) balls, which generally are cheaper than new balls.

Is it a distance ball?

A two-piece golf ball — a ball with a solid inner core and a hard cover — is designed to produce maximum distance. Typically, the hard cover is made of Surlyn. This type of ball is especially helpful for beginners or short hitters who need extra length on their shots. Because beginners tend to cut balls with poor shots or knock balls into trees and cart paths, the hard covers help those two-piece balls last longer.

Is it a performance ball

A high-performance ball is the most expensive ball on the market. It is made of multi-layer construction (three or four pieces) and uses a softer cover material, which allows for greater control, particularly around the green, and spin. Because of the softer cover materials, these types of balls are also the least durable. As a result, these balls are better fits for more experienced or expert players.

What’s the compression

Golf ball compression, which refers to the hardness and tightness of the core, is measured in numbers. The lowest compression commonly available is usually 80 (although lower compression balls are available). This compression level offers more distance but less control. A 100-compression (and higher) ball gives experienced golfers greater control. Inexperienced golfers and those who do not have a fast, solid swing, are unlikely to get any benefits from a higher compression ball. Most average golfers use a ball with a compression of 90.

What’s the spin

A softer cover, especially one made of balata or urethane, can give the ball extra spin, especially on shots for which you want a ball that will stop and back up on the green rather than roll forward off the green. Look for multi-layer construction with a softer cover if you’re looking for more spin on your shots.

What’s the ball’s condition

Before you tee up the first ball you find in your bag, take a moment to see if it has been scuffed or cut. The slightest deviation can adversely affect how the ball flies and how it lands. If it’s a casual round with a buddy and you don’t want to risk an expensive ball around a lake or stream, maybe the two of you can agree to try a sacrificial ball on those shots.

It’s worth experimenting

The more you play a particular type of ball, the better you’ll know whether it’s the right one for your game. If you try a different type every time out, you’ll never know what ball will help you reach your potential, so give each ball type at least a few rounds to see if you two are a good match.

Source: GolfWeek.com

Join us in the Grill for our weekly features!

Monday
$9
Bacon BBQ Cheddar Burger w/ Side

Tuesday
$12
Chicken, Bacon and Broccoli Mac n’ Cheese

Wednesday
$9
Chicken Salad Croissant w/ Side

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal.**

Thursday
$9.50
Two Chili Dogs w/ Side

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

each entree comes with soup or salad, choice of side and a dinner Roll

Saturday
$9
Beer Batter Codwich w/ Side

All menu items are available for carryout!

 

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

Join us for our annual 3rd of July bash!

Food, family, fun & fireworks🎆

This year we are grilling out! The menu includes: grilled chicken, hot dogs, corn on the cob, cole slaw, potato chips and strawberry shortcake!

Family: $60
(for up to 5 family members)

Adults: $15
Kids Ages 4 -12: $10
Kids under 4 are free!

Join us for the fun!

Live music by Abbott & Ballard
Activities for the kids
Bounce house, corn hole and more
Dinner starts at 7pm
Fireworks at dusk

How the Golfball Affects Your Game

Written by: Brian Hill

Golfers spend hours getting properly fitted for golf clubs and invest hundreds of dollars for the latest in club technology, but the sometimes overlook the options available in golf balls. Golf ball technology has come a long way from the “featheries” of yesteryear. Those balls were basically leather sacks stuffed with wet goose feathers. When the feathers dried, the ball filled out. Featheries were a vast improvement over the wooden balls preceding them, just as modern balls are a substantial improvement over the first rubber balls called gutties.

Distance

Golf balls are manufactured to favor distance or control, although ball manufacturers try to reach a compromise between the two with some models. Distance balls have a lower spin rate, which results in a longer shots. The covering is made of a harder material, such as surlyn, rather than the softer urethane. But the low spin rate and hard feel make these balls more of a challenge to control — around the green, for example. Recreational players with higher handicaps often prefer balls that are designed to travel a longer distance.

Control

Balls made for control have a soft feel when struck. Their increased spin makes the balls more maneuverable around the green and out of tough lies. The dimple pattern on the ball facilitates this control. The dimples reduce the drag on the surface of the ball, causing it to stay in the air longer. If you’re an accomplished amateur with a low handicap you’ll probably prefer a golf ball that gives you more control.

Compromise

According to “The Golf Book,” the differences between distance balls and control balls are less obvious than 20 years ago. Advances in technology, manufacturing processes and materials have resulted in the compromise ball, allowing longer distance than a control ball but a softer feel than a distance ball. The golfer can get the best of both types of balls.

Core Considerations

Some balls have a core that gets softer toward the center. Soft cores cause greater energy transfer upon impact, resulting in longer distance — and also softer feel. This design helps golfers with lower swing speeds increase their potential distance. Choose a ball that matches your swing speed and strength.

Constraints

The USGA puts limitations on the size, weight, speed and the potential distance of golf balls. The initial velocity and distance as tested using USGA equipment is limited, and the standards are updated to reflect the currently available equipment. A ball must be no smaller than 1.68 inches, but there is no limitation on how large it can be. It must weigh no more than 1.62 ounces, but it can be lighter.

Source: GolfWeek.com