Make Brookside your date night this Saturday!

Couples Fun Night

4-Person Scramble | 4pm Tee Off

Non-Member Entry: $60
Member Entry: $40

Includes 9 holes, prime rib dinner and prizes.

Call to sign up!
(616) 984-2381

Join us for a night of fun and good times!

Join us in the Grill for our weekly features!

Monday
$9
Pizza Burger w/ Choice of Side

Tuesday
$12
Chicken Fajita Salad w/ Roll

Wednesday
$11
Chicken Tetrazzini w/ Roll

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal.**

Thursday
$11
Steak Fajita Quesadilla

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

each entree comes with soup or salad, choice of side and a dinner Roll

Saturday
$13
Spaghetti w/ White Clam Sauce

comes with soup or salad and a dinner roll

All menu items are available for carryout!

 

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

Monday
$10
Smothered Chicken w/ Side

Tuesday
$12
Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry Over Rice

Wednesday
65 Cent Chicken Wings

$9
Flatbread Pizza

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal. (Cannot be combined with other discounts)**

Thursday
$9
Meatball Sub w/ Side

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

each entree comes with soup or salad, choice of side and a dinner Roll

Saturday
$15
Shrimp Pesto Pasta

w/ Soup or Salad and a Roll

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

Monday
$8.50
BBQ Pork Sandwich

w/ mac and cheese

Tuesday
$9
Dry Butter Codwich

served on a ciabatta roll w/ your choice of side

Wednesday
65 Cent Chicken Wings

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal. (Cannot be combined with other discounts)**

Thursday
$9
Bacon BBQ Cheddar Burger

served on a pretzel bun w/ one side

Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

each entree comes with soup or salad, choice of side and a dinner Roll

Saturday
$10
Deluxe Nachos

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

This Father’s Day, treat dad to the ultimate golf gift!

On SALE now⛳

-> Golf & Brews for $120
-> 10% Off Gift Cards
-> Buy Foursome, Get 4th Player FREE
-> BOGO Golf Round w/ Cart

Shank solution: These two changes will save you

By Michael Breed

Hitting a shank is bad enough, but they tend to come in bunches. That can really mess with your mind—and your score. Anyone who tells you to forget you just rocketed one into the trees on the right has never lived with the shanks. Consider the cause. Typically, the clubface is wide open at impact, and the swing is out to in, with the clubhead coming from the far side of the strike line and cutting to the inside. Those two conditions expose the hosel, which hits the ball, shooting it right.

First, fix the face. Square the clubface, then place both your hands on the grip in what’s called a strong position—turned dramatically away from the target. Don’t just grip the club and turn your hands back; that only rotates the face open. The combination of a square face and strong grip is what helps you close the face through impact.

“Stay turned, and let the club drop to the inside.”

Next, fix the path. Swing back, making a full shoulder turn, and as you start down, keep your back to the target a beat longer. The club will drop to the inside of the target line. From there, you can swing out to the ball without worrying about the hosel being exposed from an out-to-in path.

These changes should do the trick, but if you need a maximum dose of shank-proofing, here’s one more: Try to hit the inside-back portion of the ball with the toe of the club. That will keep your path coming from the inside and prevent the hosel from moving closer to the ball. Shanks solved!

ADVANCED CONCEPT : MAKE THE SHAFT MISS THE BALL

THINK OF BASEBALL: You’re trying to swing the bat into the ball—simple. In golf, if you envision the shaft hitting the ball, you’ll probably make contact off the hosel because that’s the end of the shaft. Instead, you have to learn to miss the ball with the shaft. The clubhead extends out farther than the hosel so you want to swing the shaft to the inside of the ball. The image of the shaft missing to the inside will help you produce center-face contact. This mind-set might be just what you need to shake those shanks.

— with Peter Morrice

 

Source: GolfDigest.com

Monday
$10
Prime Rib Wrap

Hot Prime Rib & Swiss in a Toasted Tortilla w/ Horseradish Sauce and Lettuce + Choice of Side

Tuesday
$9.50
Hot Turkey Sandwich

w/ Mashed Potatoes and Turkey Gravy

Wednesday
$9.50
Chicken A La King over Biscuits

**Kids eat free on Wednesdays! Kids up to 12 years old eat free off the kid’s menu with a regular priced meal. (Cannot be combined with other discounts)**

Thursday
$9
Black and Bleu Burger w/ Side
Friday
$18.50
Slow Roasted Prime Rib

$14.50
All You Can Eat Alaskan Cod

Each Entree Comes with Soup or Salad, Choice of Side and a Dinner Roll

Saturday
$14
Sizzler & Shrimp

Choice of Soup or Salad, a Dinner Roll + One Side

All menu items are available for carryout!
Call us at (616) 984 – 2381

Kitchen Hours:
Monday-Saturday 11am-9pm
Sunday 11 am-7pm

Backswing Checklist

By Jim McLean

People say the golf swing is all about impact. But it’s what you do before impact that determines if the strike will be any good. Getting into a solid position at the top lets you swing freely on the way down. You don’t have to fight your way back into position.

Let’s look at three things in my backswing here. First, I’ve stayed in my forward tilt toward the ball. My left shoulder is lower than my right. I’ve simply rotated around my spine, so my height hasn’t changed from address. Maintaining this tilt gives me a great chance to return the club precisely to the ball.

Second, my left wrist is flat. The left wrist controls the clubface. If my wrist was cupped (bent back), the face would be open. That turns the downswing into a recovery mission, where you have to try to shut the face or else swing way left to make room for a slice.

Finally, my back leg is braced and supporting most of my weight. This is a big one because from here, I have the leverage to drive toward the target and push off the ground. If the back leg is in a weak position, chances are the upper body will take over coming down—and that’s a killer.

Nail these positions, and the downswing is a lot simpler.

MCLEAN is based at The Biltmore in Coral Gables, Fla.

 

Source: GolfDigest.com

A Modern Blueprint to Breaking 90

By Peter Sanders

Want to break 90?  Here is my blueprint

The game is a puzzle and all the pieces fit together. Each round is a mix of good shots, average shots and bad shots or errors. The challenge is to find the piece of your game’s unique puzzle that is your greatest weakness so you can target your improvement time and money on the highest impact area. If you track the simple good and bad outcomes listed below for a few rounds, your strengths and weaknesses will become apparent.

Tee Game or Driving

Goals:  Hit 7 fairways, and limit your driving errors to 2 – preferably of the No Shot variety (see Errors below).

Distance:  I will ignore this and assume that you are playing from the appropriate tees for your game.

Fairways:  Hitting fairways is important as we are all more accurate from the short grass.

Errors:  Far more important than Fairways hit is your FREQUENCY and SEVERITY of misses. ShotByShot.com users record THREE types of Driving Errors:

  1. No Shot:  You have missed in a place from which you do not have a normal next shot, requiring some sort of advancement to get the ball back to normal play.
  2. Penalty:  A 1-stroke penalty due to hazard or unplayable lie.
  3. Lost/OB:  Stroke and distance penalty.

Approach Shots

Goals:  5 GIRs and 1 Penalty/2nd (see below)

Penalty/2nd:  This means either a penalty or a shot hit so poorly that you are left with yet another full approach shot greater than 50 yards from the hole.

Short Game

(Shots from within 50 yards of the hole)

Chip/Pitch: If you miss 13 greens, you will have at least 10 greenside save opportunities. Your goals should be:

  • % Saved:  20% (two saves)
  • % Errors:  15% shots that miss the green (approximately three every two rounds)

Sand:

You should have 2 greenside save opportunities.  Your goals:

  • % Saved:  10%
  • % Errors:  30% of your shots miss the green (approximately 1 in every 3 attempts)

Putting

You need 36 putts.  Aim for:

  • 1-Putts:  3
  • 3-Putts:  2

 

Source: GolfWRX.com

Flush Your Fairway Woods

By Michael Breed

The thing about hitting fairway woods off the turf is, most golfers feel like they have to help them into the air. They look down and don’t see much loft on the clubface, and they know they want to launch the ball high, so what do they do? The classic mistakes are playing the ball off the toe of the front foot and hanging back on the downswing to try to lift the ball. Both are killers. — with Peter Morrice

Let’s get you a clear plan for using these clubs. It starts with ball position. Yes, you’ve got a long club in your hands, so you want to play the ball forward—but not too far forward. Make sure it’s at least a couple of inches inside your front foot.

Next, to make a good strike, we have to look at your backswing. Resist the urge to just lift your arms straight up. You need some width to your swing arc, so focus on extending your hands away from the target. And not just your lead arm; feel your trail arm stretching back. This width will help you later.

Finally, you have to trust that you have enough loft to produce the trajectory you want—and you do! Keep your chest pointing down toward the ball through impact (above). Don’t pull your chest up or tilt it away from the target, or you won’t hit the ball solidly. With your chest down and the club coming in nice and shallow, you’ll catch the ball and brush the ground after impact. That’s how you flush a fairway wood.

OUR BEST LESSONS, ANYTIME, ANYWHERE

Last spring, we launched Golf Digest Schools, a video subscription service designed to help you play better golf. We’ve worked to make it everything you love about Golf Digest instruction—in curriculum-style video programs. These are not tip videos; these are developmental lessons from golf’s top teachers. We’ve added multiple programs from Butch Harmon, David Leadbetter, Hank Haney and dozens more. The best advice on driving, iron play, short game, playing strategy, even golf-specific fitness. Join us, and you’ll have all the tools at your fingertips—right on your phone—to have your best year ever. Learn more about Golf Digest Schools at golfdigest.com/allaccess.

MICHAEL BREED is Golf Digest’s Chief Digital Instructor.

 

Source: GolfDigest.com